The Best-Laid Plans

Initially I had a job lined up for the month of June. I was told that there would be work for me when I got back up to Seattle after graduating, but they never gave me a start date or anything, so I finally emailed last Thursday. In response, I was told that, actually, there isn’t a position for me because the assignment they needed people for started at the beginning of the month. So all the positions are filled and the clinics don’t need temp staff anymore. I’m kind of stressed out by this because I need money for getting set up in Japan, but it’s not all hopeless because a two-day assignment came up (it’s only 11 hours of work total, but that’s better than no work at all) and I have graduation money waiting to be deposited. So I’m only about $1,000 short, as opposed to $1,600 short. I’m trying to sell the car I own but obviously don’t drive since I, you know, don’t have a license. I’ll let you know how that goes.

On the plus side, not having a full-time job gives me plenty of time to get things done and see the people I want to see before I leave. I’m not exactly heartbroken over not having to do mind-numbing work for four weeks, I just wish I had the money I need. But I’ll figure something out. I’m optimistic.

And I do have a lot of work ahead of me, even without a day job to deal with. I have to apply for a visa and a customs exemption to bring in my medication, I have JET orientations on Friday June 25 and Saturday June 26 (and then a final domestic orientation the day before departure), I have medical and dental appointments, I should probably see the optometrist, I need new business clothes (Japanese pants are tricky, and I don’t trust that I’ll find button-down shirts that won’t gape)… moving abroad is a massive undertaking. I’m definitely not short on things to do. Which is good.

In closing, I’ve been doing tons of research into Shikoku and I just want to share this picture. I found it on Wikipedia (like my handy map from the previous entry), so it’s definitely not mine, but Wikipedia (in this case the article about the Iya Valley) seems like fair game to use as a source on the internet. It’s a picture of the Yoshino River after a typhoon and I am seriously awed by how pretty Shikoku is. Even after typhoons, which will probably be more noticeable on Shikoku than they were in Saitama. Obviously, Matsuyama is going to look virtually identical to every other Japanese city (read: concrete and wires), but when you get out of the cities, Shikoku is gorgeous. I’m going to get a bike and explore the surrounding areas ASAP.

Yoshino River, Shikoku (thanks, Wikipedia)

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2 thoughts on “The Best-Laid Plans

  1. Well, $1,000 short is definitely better than $1,600 short. I am sure you will make it somehow. I think your car could sell for a lot, since you pretty much never drive it. Will you miss it?

    Optimism is key!

    As for clothes, Japanese women are definitely differently shaped. I am thinking you will need to send a whole box of just clothes to Japan before you go.

    I would love to see pictures of the surrounding area and of your new home in Japan when you get there! It will be amazing and I can live in Japan vicariously through your blog.

    • I can buy clothes in Japan, and did last time, so I will be able to shop. But anything button-down, as well as pants, are definitely going to come from America.

      And, since I don’t drive the car, I won’t miss it. Had JET failed, I would have got my license and driven it, but at this point it’s useless and just going to sit and devalue while I’m gone. We have a potential buyer (a couple my grandparents are friends with), so if they’ll buy it I’ll be thrilled.

      And I will definitely post tons of pictures! But I still hope that maybe you’ll be able to visit at some point.

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